Catholic dating after annulment

My fiancé/e and I want to marry in the Catholic Church.

He/she has been married before and has applied for a declaration of nullity. You should not set a date until the tribunal’s decision has been finalized. Second, even if the petition is eventually granted, there may be unexpected delays in the process, e.g., if your fiancé/e’s spouse wishes to appeal the tribunal’s decision. Pope Francis has asked dioceses whenever possible to provide their tribunal services free of charge.

If the tribunal decides in favor of the nullity of the marriage, the parties are then free to marry in the Catholic Church, unless an appeal of the decision is lodged or the decision includes a prohibition against one or both of the parties marrying until certain underlying issues have been resolved (see Code of Canon Law, 1682.1). The length will depend upon the type of process that is followed, e.g., the ordinary judicial process, the process before the bishop, a documentary process, or a process before a Roman court.

Your diocesan tribunal will be able to give you a more exact estimate based upon your case.

Exceptions to the last requirement must be approved by Church authority.Parental obligations remain after a marriage may be declared null. A person cannot know today if they might want to marry in the future when crucial witnesses may be deceased or their own memories may have dimmed.Why does the Catholic Church require an intended spouse, who is divorced but not Catholic, to obtain a declaration of nullity before marrying in the Catholic Church?Why does the Church require a divorced Catholic to obtain a declaration of nullity before marrying in the Church?In fidelity to Jesus’ teaching, the Church believes that marriage is a lifelong bond (see Matt 19:1-10); therefore, unless one’s spouse has died, the Church requires the divorced Catholic to obtain a declaration of nullity before marrying someone else.

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